Pet Stores Profits Are On The Rise But Shoplifting Is Too – Prevent The Pilfering Of Puppy Apparel With Clothing Security Tags

 

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Pet Stores Profits Are On The Rise But Shoplifting Is Too – Prevent The Pilfering Of Puppy Apparel With Clothing Security Tags
     Pets, we love them in the U.S. in fact we love them so much that according to SAGE Business Researcher in an article titled, “The Pet Industry”, by Janice Arenofsky, February 27, 2017, the writer states, “Spending on pets in the United States continued to increase even through the 2007-2009 recession and hit an estimated $62.75 billion in 2016.” http://businessresearcher.sagepub.com/sbr-1863-102160-2772364/20170227/the-pet-industry That is quite a sum of money to spend on our furry (and sometimes not-so-furry for all you reptile, bird and insect lovers) friends. Many employers even offer pet insurance now (it is offered at the locations where I work). Where it once was taboo to bring a pet into a store it has now become commonplace. I see them in pet carriers, sometimes on leashes and occasionally I have seen them in baby strollers (at least I hope that was a dog otherwise there are some really ugly babies with wet noses out there). Relax, I’m just kidding folks. I tried to get some facts on how much Americans spend on pet clothing alone but I was unable to locate that information. What I was able to find was in a 2016 article, “Last Year, the NRF (National Retail Federation) estimated that $350 million was spent on pet costumes…” according to a cnbc.com article, “More consumers are purchasing pet costumes for Halloween than ever before”, by Sarah Whitten, 29 Oct 2016. If we are spending more than $350 million for pet costumes you can imagine how much we are spending for pet clothing overall. How do retailers protect their pet clothes? Why not protect them like we protect human clothing? Clothing security tags don’t have to be on human clothes only. 
     When I’m discussing clothing security tags, I’m referring to Checkpoint tags specifically. These devices are designed to prevent shoplifting through deterrence and the use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology. The way the tags work is they are designed so that they transmit a radio wave of a specific frequency. EAS pedestals located near key points in a building such as entrances and exits detect this specific radio frequency. When a tagged item is carried too close to the detection field the pedestals have alarms that are triggered. Store workers respond to those alarms, conduct receipt checks and recover unpaid merchandise. Checkpoint tags also deter shoplifters because they are designed to be visible and it is apparent they could very well damage merchandise if pried at or tampered with. Many professional shoplifters already know what the tags are when they see them and prefer to find products that don’t appear to be protected.
     So exactly how much do pet clothes run? One major pet retailer sells an “anxiety shirt” for $39.95 and sports team jerseys for up to $28.99. An online designer pet boutique store advertises a doggie hoodie for $64.99. I don’t spend $64.99 on a winter coat for me! The fact remains there are folks who will spend that kind of money to dress up a pet that already comes with a fur coat of its own. For traditional stores that carry these lines of merchandise it only makes sense that the merchandise should be protected from theft with clothing security tags. 
     Checkpoint tags can be applied to these clothing items in the same way they are attached to human clothes. The only difference is that the garments are smaller in size so the tags may appear to be bigger but the protection given is just as robust. Tiny clothing items stuffed in a purse will activate an EAS pedestal just as they would activate it if they were human clothes shoved into the same purse. While you are putting clothing security tags on doggie outerwear you should know you can use the same tags to protect other merchandise that may be of high value such as pet beds, collars and leashes. Shoplifting is made more difficult when merchants protect as many items as possible.
     Pets and pet accessories are big business. Where there is a store making a profit there will be shoplifters to pilfer. Prevent petty (and not so petty) theft by using Checkpoint tags on your pet softlines goods.
For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

Pets, we love them in the U.S. in fact we love them so much that according to SAGE Business Researcher in an article titled, “The Pet Industry”, by Janice Arenofsky, February 27, 2017, the writer states, “Spending on pets in the United States continued to increase even through the 2007-2009 recession and hit an estimated $62.75 billion in 2016.” http://businessresearcher.sagepub.com/sbr-1863-102160-2772364/20170227/the-pet-industry That is quite a sum of money to spend on our furry (and sometimes not-so-furry for all you reptile, bird and insect lovers) friends. Many employers even offer pet insurance now (it is offered at the locations where I work). Where it once was taboo to bring a pet into a store it has now become commonplace. I see them in pet carriers, sometimes on leashes and occasionally I have seen them in baby strollers (at least I hope that was a dog otherwise there are some really ugly babies with wet noses out there). Relax, I’m just kidding folks. I tried to get some facts on how much Americans spend on pet clothing alone but I was unable to locate that information. What I was able to find was in a 2016 article, “Last Year, the NRF (National Retail Federation) estimated that $350 million was spent on pet costumes…” according to a cnbc.com article, “More consumers are purchasing pet costumes for Halloween than ever before”, by Sarah Whitten, 29 Oct 2016. If we are spending more than $350 million for pet costumes you can imagine how much we are spending for pet clothing overall. How do retailers protect their pet clothes? Why not protect them like we protect human clothing? Clothing security tags don’t have to be on human clothes only. 

When I’m discussing clothing security tags, I’m referring to Checkpoint tags specifically. These devices are designed to prevent shoplifting through deterrence and the use of electronic article surveillance (EAS) technology. The way the tags work is they are designed so that they transmit a radio wave of a specific frequency. EAS pedestals located near key points in a building such as entrances and exits detect this specific radio frequency. When a tagged item is carried too close to the detection field the pedestals have alarms that are triggered. Store workers respond to those alarms, conduct receipt checks and recover unpaid merchandise. Checkpoint tags also deter shoplifters because they are designed to be visible and it is apparent they could very well damage merchandise if pried at or tampered with. Many professional shoplifters already know what the tags are when they see them and prefer to find products that don’t appear to be protected.

So exactly how much do pet clothes run? One major pet retailer sells an “anxiety shirt” for $39.95 and sports team jerseys for up to $28.99. An online designer pet boutique store advertises a doggie hoodie for $64.99. I don’t spend $64.99 on a winter coat for me! The fact remains there are folks who will spend that kind of money to dress up a pet that already comes with a fur coat of its own. For traditional stores that carry these lines of merchandise it only makes sense that the merchandise should be protected from theft with clothing security tags. 

Checkpoint tags can be applied to these clothing items in the same way they are attached to human clothes. The only difference is that the garments are smaller in size so the tags may appear to be bigger but the protection given is just as robust. Tiny clothing items stuffed in a purse will activate an EAS pedestal just as they would activate it if they were human clothes shoved into the same purse. While you are putting clothing security tags on doggie outerwear you should know you can use the same tags to protect other merchandise that may be of high value such as pet beds, collars and leashes. Shoplifting is made more difficult when merchants protect as many items as possible.

Pets and pet accessories are big business. Where there is a store making a profit there will be shoplifters to pilfer. Prevent petty (and not so petty) theft by using Checkpoint tags on your pet softlines goods.

 

For more information about clothing security tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

 

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